Wesley J. Wildman

In 2010, I published a programmatic vision for a kind of philosophy of religion that is consistent with the ethics of the modern secular research university. Specifically, I argue that philosophy of religion should be: inherently comparative, thinking across and between human religions, rather than focusing on one or two favored traditions; and profoundly multidisciplinary, drawing upon the natural and social sciences as well as diverse humanistic disciplines to address questions arising within philosophy of religion. I have put this vision into practice and I created a website that is dedicated to furthering conversation between professional philosophers of religion about their field and its future.

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Laura Weed

I have been teaching Philosophy of Religion for many years, but have been frustrated that the subject area frequently is focused in a way that valorizes beliefs and cognitive and analytical approaches to the subject, which miss much of what religions are about. Western rationalism, by focusing methodologically on logical analysis, and western empiricism, by focusing methodologically  on perception, both miss the point when discussing religions. The global critical approach allows scholarship to focus more on religious practices than on religious beliefs.

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Steven G. Smith

As a philosopher of religion with a base in a religious studies program, I have been able to do sustained work on figuring out how to address core conceptual questions for the study of religion–questions about the nature of religious intentions, expressions, meanings, and objects of reference–in cross-cultural perspective, which is a standard of adequate understanding of religious topics.

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Aaron Simmons

Philosophy of Religion is a discourse that straddles a variety of professional communities, debates, and traditions. I take it that this is one of its strengths. Yet, this can often, perhaps ironically, lead to narrowness in ideas, isolationism in disciplinary perspectives, and traditionalism in vision. Global Critical Philosophy of Religion offers a way forward because it expands the conversation partners involved and becomes more inclusive of the variety of disciplinary resources available for questions attending the philosophical study of cultural traditions termed “religious.” Even though challenging, and humbling, I am excited to incorporate Global Critical approaches into my teaching, my research, and my public intellectual work. 

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Sonia Sikka

My research has led me to question the division between religion and philosophy, asking about the criteria used to place various forms of thought, reflection and practice under one of these categories as opposed to the other (e.g. a volume edited with Ashwani Peetush). The question about the faith/reason binary affects my approach to the project of globalizing the philosophy of religion. The Asian traditions, in particular Indian ones, with which I am engaged can be taught as religion, but they are also philosophical, though they have been largely excluded from the Eurocentric canon of most philosophy departments. I aim to connect with other scholars concerned with decolonizing the curriculum of both philosophy of religion and philosophy more generally.

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Lisa Rosenlee

I am interested in destabilizing the category of “religion” which is conventionally defined as a monotheistic belief/practice and at the same time paradoxically where an array of non-western intellectual traditions that are non-monotheistic, such as Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, are conventionally housed. Much of this sort of paradoxical categorization of non-western intellectual traditions as “religion” has to do with the formation of the philosophical canon during the late 18th and early 19th century where non-western philosophical traditions were systematic excluded and hence relegated to “Religion” instead of being recognized as “Philosophy.” As an Asian and Comparative philosopher, I strive to provide a countercurrent to this sort of approach to both religion and non-western philosophies.

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Jin Y. Park

I am interested in developing a philosophy of religion that can explain religious phenomena and religious philosophy based on diverse religious traditions. Diversity in this case can be understood in terms of regions (inclusion of non-Western religious traditions), topics (including gender & social issues), and approaches (philosophical, narrative, experimental and so on). I have published several articles in which I discussed a philosophy of religion drawn from East Asian religious traditions and demonstrated that when we expand the scope of philosophy of religion beyond the West centered practice, we can see various possibilities to explain the meaning and values of religion in our life, and manifestations of such appear in different forms in different religious traditions and different life situations.

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Herbert Moyo

I am a comparative philosopher interested in demonstrating that, among the Nguni people of Southern Africa, ‘religion’ is neither monotheistic nor a belief system. What may be called religion by Western philosophers is a way of life that fulfils the Isintu ethic of Ubuntu. Isintu is a term that envelopes traditions, cultures and worldviews of a Nguni–Ndebele community. Ubuntu is lived in community of the living, the living dead and those yet to be born. My research on Isintuism uses ethnophilosophy to expose and discuss the Nguni knowledge systems, ‘beliefs’ and normative human communal behaviors that are embedded in Isintu. I show that this African intellectual traditions are embedded in idioms, proverbs and folklore which are the philosophy and or sources of the philosophy of ‘religion’ of Isintuism.

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Nathan Loewen

The past 60 years of scholarship among Anglophone philosophers of religion developed a highly-focused field of inquiry whose language structures are surprisingly uniform. I see there an opportunity to apply computational analyses (digital humanities) to ask critical questions about the composition of the field. Were theoretical debates elsewhere in the humanities completely ignored? What is the probability for topics of inquiry with different data?

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Raphael Latester

I research on Religion, Philosophy, and Politics, with much of my work being in the Philosophy of Religion, concerning God’s existence. I am interested in global-critical Philosophy of Religion, as my ongoing research finds that alternatives to the classical theism so dominant in the field, such as pantheism and panentheism, found globally, are more evidentially probable.

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